Kenedy County leaders graduate from first-ever training class

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Focus is to develop leadership skills & knowledge
ROBERT WILCOX Reporter

Focus is to develop leadership skills & knowledge

FIVE KENEDY COUNTY RESIDENTS GRADUATED FROM A LEADERSHIP CLASS sponsored by the county and conducted by Texas A&M. From left to right are; County Extension Agent John Ford, graduate Jerry Medellin, graduate Michelle Hinojosa, graduate and Commissioner Cindy Gonzales, sponsor and fellow Commissioner Anne Armstrong, graduate and Judge Cecilia Schulz, and graduate Clay Wolter. (See story on Page 4.) FIVE KENEDY COUNTY RESIDENTS GRADUATED FROM A LEADERSHIP CLASS sponsored by the county and conducted by Texas A&M. From left to right are; County Extension Agent John Ford, graduate Jerry Medellin, graduate Michelle Hinojosa, graduate and Commissioner Cindy Gonzales, sponsor and fellow Commissioner Anne Armstrong, graduate and Judge Cecilia Schulz, and graduate Clay Wolter. (See story on Page 4.) Five Kenedy County residents graduated from a comprehensive course put on by Texas A&M University's Cooperative Extension earlier this month, that expanded their knowledge of community issues and developed their leadership skills.

Last Thursday evening the Kenedy Ranch Museum hosted and Texas A&M hosted a graduation ceremony for current and future community and political leaders at the Carriage House in Sarita.

Armstrong Ranch foreman Jerry Medellin took away three items from the classes that affects ranch operations.

"The economic and social impact of undocumented illegal aliens that run through the county was one," Medellin said. "The I- 69 Corridor is likely going to tranist the county, and there could be revenue from it."

"Also - windfarms have a 10- year life, so we discussed the ecological impacts and potential damages from storms," he added.

The other four graduates were; Cindy Gonzales, county commissioner for Pct. 4, Michelle Hinojosa, Armstrong part-time postmaster, Cecilia Schulz, justice of the peace for Pct. 3, and Clay Wolter, ranch manager for the Kenedy Memorial Foundation.

Wolter said that every class was very informative.

"I've been here over eight years and learned about things I did not know," Wolter said. "In the education module we found that we'll be facing funding challenges due to Sarita being considered a rich (per capita) school district."

John Ford, the county's extension agent, worked with Texas A&M to develop class modules in the following areas;

- Outlook for ranching and ecotourism.

- Immigration issues. - History of the region. - The I-69 Corridor route. - Ranch management challenges.

- Education issues.

Ford recruited recognized guest speakers for each class, and thanked county commissioners for supporting the training effort for tomorrow's leaders.

Justice of the Peace Schulz liked being able to rank the different modules in order of their importance to county issues.

Interested residents for the next class should contact their commissioner for a nomination. More information on the program can be obtained from Ford at 361-595- 8566.

E-mail comments on this story to; robert@raymondvillechroniclenews.com

2007-09-19 / Front Page

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